They Said What?

Home » 2014 » August

Monthly Archives: August 2014

Interactive Health

The Interactive Health case study has been removed from the “Smoking Guns,” because it has so many obvious errors that we use it instead as the “issue spotter” for the advanced-level course and certification in Critical Outcomes Report Analysis.

I also wouldn’t trust them as my wellness vendor even if they didn’t make up outcomes. I had the misfortune of attending one of their screens. They “screened” me for calf tightness. It turns out my calves are tight. Admittedly, I can see why tight calves could impact productivity for some employees. (Example: first basemen.)   And I could just feel my own productivity soaring after they loosened them up…until the left one went into spasm that night.

It also would be nice, assuming they are going to do these screens, to actually send people their results without being reminded four or five times.

 

Viverae wellness primes its own pump for an EEOC wellness lawsuit

Viverae

Category:  Wellness

Short Summary of Company:

“Viverae gives our clients a platform for managing healthcare costs by motivating their employees to make healthy choices. Our comprehensive wellness programs address your organization’s goals to meet your employees where they are.”

Materials Being Reviewed:

viverae

viverae500

Questions for Viverae:

General:  What customers have actually signed up for this and are willing to admit it?

ANS: Refused to answer

Provision #2: Since your biometrics are out of compliance with USPSTF guidelines, wouldn’t a customer be risking an EEOC lawsuit by “requiring” every employee to do this against their will, subject to a large fine?

ANS: Refused to answer

Provision #4: Isn’t this the same as saying “If you sign up for two years, we’ll give you a third year maybe at a 20% discount if you do everything perfectly, but by doing so you waive your right to cancel after one or two years” ?

ANS: Refused to answer

Provision #5: Has any customer of Viverae or any other wellness vendor with 1000 or more employees completed HRAs and submitted to biometric screens at a 100% rate, as you require in Provision #2?

ANS: Refused to answer

Provision #6: How could a health plan get a positive return on this program by offering people $720 apiece, when wellness-sensitive medical events account for less than $200/person in claims spend?

ANS: Refused to answer

Speaking of Provision #6, if your very own website says savings are $500/person (I’d be curious what legitimate academic research supports that), how can you guarantee savings when the cost of the incentive alone is $720?

 ANS: Refused to answer

 

 

Did you know 100% of your employees have chronic disease? Wellsource says so!

Wellsource

Short Summary of Company:

“Wellsource pioneered the concept of computer-assisted wellness. Today, more than 30 years later, Wellsource continues to offer innovative, evidence-based health assessments and online wellness tools that improve lives and contribute to a healthy bottom line.”

Materials being reviewed:

wellsource stats

wellsource stats part 2

Questions for Wellsource

How is it that 100% of the employees at this company have a chronic disease?

ANS: Refused to answer

If “cancer” were a chronic disease as you claim it is, like diabetes or heart disease or asthma, how come no one ever says:  “I have lung cancer, but my doctor says we’re staying on top of it”?

ANS: Refused to answer

If “stroke” were a chronic disease as you claim it is, how come every minute you don’t get to the ER following a stroke increases the odds you’ll end up like the Kardashians?   Wouldn’t “stroke” be the epitome of an acute event rather than a chronic disease?

ANS: Refused to answer

If all these people are so sick, how come the largest opportunity per employee to save money ($40,000/employee!) is to get a few more people to buckle their seatbelts 100% of the time instead of 95% of the time?

ANS: Refused to answer

Speaking of seat belts, does it increase your credibility with potential purchasers that seat belt use is expressed the wrong way (96% buckle, meaning the correct figure to enter here would be  “4%,” the ones who don’t always buckle)?

ANS: Refused to answer

If a whopping 89% of your employees have high blood pressure as defined by 140/90, do you think there is a chance you made a mistake in measuring this variable?

ANS: Refused to answer

How can you save $6154.28 per employee in health spending just on these items when the average employee doesn’t spend $6154.28 in healthcare costs altogether?

ANS: Refused to answer

How is this $6154.28 savings/employee figure (expressed in your materials as $615,428 for the 100 employees in this company)  consistent with sourcing Steve Aldana, who claims that you always save $1358.85 per employee, whether you get a 0% improvement or a 100% improvement in risk factors?

ANS: Refused to answer

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: