They Said What?

Home » Code of Conduct

Category Archives: Code of Conduct

At Schlumberger, Today is Take-Your-Stupid-Wellness-Vendor-to-Work Day.

Once again, having been snake-charmed by HeathyWage, Schlumberger is offering a crash-dieting contest, starting today, January 22.

Once again, they are ignoring every iota of research that says crash-dieting is a complete waste of time. It may also harm you. Once again, they are offering a whopping $10,000 prize to the winning team.

The relevant language from the Wellness Code of Conduct

Here is the relevant language from the Employee Health and Wellness Program Code of Conduct.  The language that the group agreed upon — “may have negative effects on their health” — was intended to be as acceptable as possible to what has become an delightfully large Ethical Wellness group:

Research shows that the vast majority of people who participate in weight loss programs will eventually gain their weight back after the program ends. Many will also gain back more than they lose. The weight cycling that occurs with repeated participation in weight loss programs may have negative effects on their health.

It’s also slightly possible that offering a $10,000 prize (for a team of five) could exacerbate the harms of weight-cycling just a tiny bit by encouraging employees to binge, bloat, salt and constipate themselves before the first weigh-in. But no team would ever do that, right? After all, it’s not worth sacrificing your ethics or harming yourself in order to win a measly $2000/team member.

Haha, good one, Al.

The relevant language from Here’s How to Win a Corporate Biggest Loser Contest

On the weigh-in day, avoid the bathroom before weigh-in if you can, and minimize your activity, another big glass of  whole milk with your breakfast that contains some salty options will help you retain more water.  If you are also going to get your waist measured, drink about half a can of root beer.  Sounds gross, but the carbonation and salt will give you are really good belly bloat…If they are measuring your waist, wear some pants that are snug around the waist, or add a tight belt that hits below your belly button, this will create some fluid buildup in your belly area.  At this point you should be a big bloated sloshing mess that needs to go to the bathroom really bad.   This is the perfect time to get weighed and measured.  If you are getting measured, poor posture can get you another inch and a half, so go for it.

To their credit, even the group that gives this advice has a more adult sense of responsibility than Schlumberger and HealthyWage, as they preface a few pages of advice with:

It’s getting to be New Year’s resolution time and many companies will try and “encourage” weight loss with a “Biggest Loser” type contest.  Frankly, this is really a bad idea, as it can create all kinds of bad habits and damaging activities by the participants, as they starve, dehydrate and supplement themselves in an effort to win.

The relevant language from Schlumberger’s vendor, HealthyWage

Let’s look at the marketing pitch from HealthyWage, the outfit that runs this contest and epitomizes everything that makes the wellness industry what it is today:

That equates to over 50 pounds per person, in their 12-week contests — more than 4 pounds a week.* This means one of five things:

  1. Employees are indeed binging, bloating, salting and constipating themselves before the contest to maximize their odds of winning, since losing 50 pounds in 12 weeks would be a Herculean task without a bunch of extra weight that will be as easy to take off as it was to put on, thanks in part to websites that show you how to gain weight rapidly in preparation for corporate crash-dieting contests;
  2. Healthywage is unfamiliar with the CDC guidelines that recommend steady weight loss at 1-2 pounds per week;
  3. Healthywage is betting that employers don’t know that the odds of keeping weight off are 1 in 200 for males and 1 in 100 for females;
  4. Heathywage is counting repeat contestants more than once, meaning that the same employees binge, crash-diet, regain the weight and then do it all over again;
  5. Heathywage is lying.

Of course, this being the wellness industry, it may be all five.

*How does a 50-pound weight loss compare to other companies? Pfizer won a Koop Award because its participating employees were able to lose — get ready — four ounces. Six if you measure against the two ounces gained by non-participants. In all fairness, Pfizer’s program was not exactly intensive. “Participate” was defined as “open an email with a message in it.”  The good news is that opening an email isn’t going to harm anyone.

Plus you never know what a message will contain.  Open this link to see an example.

More Media Coverage Slamming New Genetic-Screening Wellness Bill

This afternoon STATNews followed up with more criticism of HR 1313, the Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act.  As measured by comments to their previous article and the Washington Post’s article, public opinion is running about 999-to-1 against it.  That’s a lot even for wellness.

Ryan Picarella, of WELCOA, jumped on this and got way ahead of HERO, which is not opposing it.  They can’t. Aetna is a major dues-paying supporter, and Aetna loves genetically screening employees for defects. Naturally they fabricate their outcomes.  This time we mean it literally when we say: “Lying is part of wellness vendor DNA.” Aetna even invested in a company to further their dystopian vision, a company ironically named Newtopia.

By contrast, this is the kind of leadership we’ve come to expect from WELCOA, filling the ethical vacuum created by HERO.

But, more importantly, this article is the first media mention of Ethical Wellness, our new website dedicated to putting the wellness back in wellness. You might recall the original Workplace Wellness Code of Conduct.  Ethical Wellness has updated it.  You can sign on to the website, join and endorse, all at no cost.  You can also contribute, separately, and be highlighted as a contributor. Scott Life and Dan Keith have both pitched in $500, as compared by to my $10 (to test the donating mechanism — that’s my story and I’m sticking to it). I’ll be putting in the other $490 shortly. Really.  There is also a linkedin group.  No mass postings — a true discussion group.

We’ll be talking more about Ethical Wellness in the coming days.  for now, it’s about not fining employees for refusing to have their children genetically screened for defects.



Wellsteps: We don’t need your stinkin’ Code of Conduct.

Wellsteps has joined Michael O’Donnell, HERO and Optum in attempting to stonewall the Employee Health Code of Conduct, which started as a joint project among WELCOA, myself, and Salveo Partners and has attracted many hundreds of favorable responses.  Quizzify and It Starts with Me have both received validation from the Validation Institute for (among other things) our embrace of this simple minimum standard. In both cases, we think the bar should be set much higher, but apparently “do no harm” is already too high a hurdle for HERO, Wellsteps and Optum.  Hence their opposition.  And Kudos to WELCOA, a very fine organization that Quizzify intends to support for 2017, for standing up to Mr. Aldana’s bullying.

There is some irony in that it was Wellsteps’ harms to Boise employees that inspired my participation in the code-writing. Vendors should not be given awards for harming employees. That doesn’t seem like too much to ask.

Here is the Code, in its entirety.

The Employee Health Program Code of Conduct:  Programs Should Do No Harm

Our organization resolves that its program should do no harm to employee health, corporate integrity or employee/employer finances. Instead we will endeavor to support employee well-being for our customers, their employees and all program constituents.

Employee Benefits and Harm Avoidance

Our organization will recommend doing programs with/for employees rather than to them, and will focus on promoting well-being and avoiding bad health outcomes. Our choices and frequencies of screenings are consistent with United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), CDC guidelines, and Choosing Wisely.

Our relevant staff will understand USPSTF guidelines, employee harm avoidance, wellness-sensitive medical event measurement, and outcomes analysis.   

Employees will not be singled out, fined, or embarrassed for their health status.

Respect for Corporate Integrity and Employee Privacy

We will not share employee-identifiable data with employers and will ensure that all protected health information (PHI) adheres to HIPAA regulations and any other applicable laws.

Commitment to Valid Outcomes Measurement

Our contractual language and outcomes reporting will be transparent and plausible. All research limitations (e.g., “participants vs. non-participants” or the “natural flow of risk” or ignoring dropouts) and methodology will be fully disclosed, sourced, and readily available.

What’s there not to like?  Plenty, if you negatively impact employee health, as Wellsteps does, according to STATNews. Here is Wellsteps’ response to the code, complete with their signature name-calling.

The Wellness Bully Code of Conduct

Even though the wellness bullies claim that the wellness industry is a sham, they have announced a new code of wellness conduct.  I’m very interested in improving the quality and effectiveness of wellness programs. I don’t know any wellness professional who would say otherwise. But I think I speak for all of us when I say that I have no interest in a code of conduct written by a gang of bullies. The wellness industry does not need a code of conduct, we have HIPAA and other laws to do that. 

%d bloggers like this: