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Wellsteps stumbles over their own words

Often I don’t have time to write a full blog in my own words, but fortunately I usually don’t need to. It’s enough to quote the words of the very stable geniuses in the wellness industry verbatim. Being quoted verbatim, of course, is one of these geniuses’ worst nightmares.

Among the most stable of the wellness industry geniuses is Steve Aldana, CEO of Wellsteps, winner of the 2016 Koop Award as well as the 2016 Deplorables Award. How does he report the National Bureau of Economic Research’s complete evisceration of wellness industry research methods? Let’s take a looksee at the highlights of his posting.

First, it appears that two opposing studies, “one for and one against wellness,” came out “at the same time.”

One the one hand, someone — apparently he doesn’t know who — seems to say that there “wasn’t much improvement” at the University of Illinois.  And something must have been wrong with this result, because “these results contradict over 90% of publish [sic] studies.”

“At the same time,” a publication no one has heard of found the opposite: health behaviors improved for “over 2 full years” in — get ready — one of Wellsteps’ very own accounts.


This is a textbook example of a false equivalence, the wellness version of: “You also had some people that were very fine people on both sides.”

To begin with, the researchers in the first group weren’t just any old researchers. This was the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). And the NBER didn’t say “they didn’t see much improvement.” Their specific words were that the causal effects were — get ready — nearly indistinguishable from zero for nearly every outcome.

Further to say this conclusion “contradicts over 90% of published studies about wellness,” would be like saying Galileo’s findings “contradicted” over 90% of published studies about astronomy.

The study’s actual conclusion used a slightly different verb:

Our 95% confidence intervals rule out 78 percent of previous estimates [of the effect of wellness] on medical spending and absenteeism from the prior literature. [Let me translate that, in case the words are too long for the very stable geniuses at Wellsteps to understand: you and all your very stable friends have been geniusing about savings for decades now.]

The reason the NBER was able to be so conclusive is that, to quote one of our Alert Readers, Robert Dawkins: “They foolishly included a valid control group.” Kudos to Mr. Dawkins for that very unstable moronic observation. (In any event, far from contradicting other research, the study is quite consistent with most articles on wellness not written by someone feeding at the employer wellness trough.)

The other journal, which published an article “at the same time,” found an improvement in healthy behaviors. That journal is called Health Promotion Practice. And if you haven’t heard of it, you’ve got company. Their “impact factor” is the lowest in an industry whose journals are notable for low impact factors. I googled quite extensively, and it appears — get ready — that no article from this journal has ever been cited, excerpted or even had the fact of its very existence even grudgingly acknowledged in the lay or scholarly media.

By contrast, the NBER article has been picked up everywhere — except of course by the wellness industry. See if you can find any reference to this article — or AARP v. EEOC, which was also national news — on the Health Enhancement Research Organization website.

Turns out there’s a reason no one cites this journal. It’s because it’s so genius. Exhibit A is this very same article, a rehash of the Boise School District findings that somehow overlooked the key finding, which is that the employees got unhealthier during Wellsteps’ program. Instead, the author — displaying not the slightest intellectual curiosity as to how this could possibly be true — reports the most genius findings we’ve ever seen in a journal:

  • only 3% of Boise School District employees smoke, and…
  • …they smoke only 4 days a week.

Perhaps — just playing devil’s advocate here — the other 17% of Boise employees who smoke (Idaho has a 20% smoking rate) might have lied on their health risk assessment? The “tell” is that everybody knows smokers don’t smoke only 4 days a week. Obviously, they smoke 5 days a week, with time off for weekends, major holidays and Beethoven’s Birthday.

Very stable genius that he is, the author (both a friend of Wellsteps’ Mr. Aldana, according to the disclosure statement, and also a genius who has already been profiled on this site for his previous insights) also admits that with a high non-participation rate and a 20% dropout rate:

There exists the possibility of selection or dropout bias that could have influenced the results reported.

Ya think? Maybe just a tiny bit?


But wait…there’s more

We’ve highlighted Mr. Aldana’s phrase “at the same time” describing how these articles were simultaneously published. We repeated the phrase in three separate places above for emphasis because — get ready — these two results were not published at anything like the same time.

To begin with, Mr. Aldana has been very stably geniusing about his Boise results for more than two years now. (See my article from September 2015 accurately forecasting that, thanks to the number of obvious errors and self-immolating contradictions, this study would win a Koop Award. And of course the Boise employees got harmed.)

This article, using that same data set, was published last July, whereas the NBER article just came out a few weeks ago. Perhaps in some geologic sense July 2017 and January 2018 are “the same time,” but imagine if the rest of the world defined “at the same time” as “six months apart.” For instance, let’s join Sherman and Mr. Peabody in the Wayback Machine and set the dial for June 1944:

Eisenhower: “OK, we’ll storm Omaha and Utah Beaches, and you guys can storm Juno and Sword Beaches at the same time, and then we’ll hook up and say…”

Churchill: “…Merry Christmas, chaps.”



For a good time, try googling on Wellsteps.

And no need to google on their “ROI Calculator.”  I’ve done it for you.

Hey, How Come Wellness Needs an ROI But Real Healthcare Doesn’t?

Now that the myth that there is any ROI in wellness is thoroughly both debunked and also even acknowledged by the wellness industry, vendors often fall back on the “argument” that nothing else in healthcare needs an ROI.  Why should workplace wellness be singled out?  The editor of the American Journal of Health Promotion, Michael O’Donnell, even asked: “Who cares about an ROI anyway?”

The answer to Michael’s question?  Everyone should care. And everyone should insist on an ROI from wellness, for three distinct reasons.  Each reason is sufficient on its own.  So even if there were a fallacy in two of the reasons (and there isn’t), the remaining reason would still be definitive.

First, consider an employee with appendicitis. You don’t calculate an ROI. You call an ambulance. But suppose a vendor says to you: “If an employee’s appendix bursts, the cost could be $100,000.  So we propose taking out everyone’s appendix preventively.”

You’d ask:  “What’s the rate of burst appendixes and how much do appendectomies cost?”  While that’s an extreme example (and we didn’t mean to give these people any ideas), this is basically the calculation you should make when vendors propose screens. Here’s how to do the calculation. You’ll be shocked at how much it costs to avoid even one event by screening everyone.

Second, wellness is the only thing in healthcare that employees are forced to do, subject to a financial forfeiture of penalties or lost incentives.  Other activities which people are penalized for not doing include: wearing helmets/life jackets/seat belts and getting kids vaccinated.  In each case, the clinical evidence/science overwhelms considerations of personal choice.  (Even then, in some states personal choice still rules.)

By contrast, the only thing that’s overwhelming about wellness evidence/science is how overwhelmingly the evidence eviscerates wellness, which of course is what this site is all about.  Unfortunately, wellness vendors don’t understand evidence — or for that matter healthcare itself. Many vendors have no knowledge of basics like clinical guidelines, or even arithmetic.  One wonders how they can do their jobs as wellness vendors without understanding healthcare. And that brings us to the third reason that wellness (unlike healthcare) needs an ROI, which is…

Wellness isn’t healthcare.  Quite literally every other provider of physical healthcare–from heart surgeons to  acupuncturists–needs to train, pass a test, get a license, take continuing education, and be subject to review by an oversight board.  Not wellness vendors.  You can become a wellness vendor for $67,000. “Up to” eight days of classroom and on-the-job-training are also included in that $67,000.  (To put that in perspective, Four Seasons housekeepers get ten days of training.) The vendor that offers these franchises, Star Wellness, brags about how no healthcare background is needed to be a wellness vendor. A background in “sales or municipal administration” is perfectly sufficient.

So if you’re wondering why wellness vendors know so little about wellness, there’s your answer:  they aren’t required to know anything about wellness. Knowing just a little exceeds the minimum requirement.

Quizzify Q in B and W

Quizzify does have an ROI…and it’s guaranteed.

To conclude, here is our advice to workplace wellness vendors trying to justify what popular healthcare blogger Paul Levy calls the “wellness tax“: shut up and just be happy you still get to collect it, and that the authorities haven’t shut you down. (A doctor doing all this overscreening and billing for it would have been shut down.)

Don’t try to justify your hyperdiagnostic jihad on the basis of ROI or any other purpose other than enriching your bank accounts. Every time you try, you provide yet another reason why whatever college gave you a degree in anything other than advanced idiocy should lose its accreditation.

Our Number 1 posting ever: The Wellness ROI Calculator

Our most widely read blog post offers a free Wellness ROI calculator.  It’s been getting hit after hit in the weeks we’ve had it up.  Further, no one has found any mistakes in it, which is unique in the ROI calculator field.  (The Brand X ROI calculator — we won’t mention any names but it rhymes with Wellsteps — is nothing but a mistake, since if you zero out inflation, their model always shows $1359/employee in savings by 2020.)

If you missed it (meaning ours), this is a good opportunity to download it and use it yourselves.

Here is the link directly to the calculator.  You still need to scroll down, though, to the June 30 posting.

 

Finally–a Free Wellness ROI Tool That Isn’t Made Up

We are pleased to present a free wellness ROI estimation model, as we promised about 3 months ago.  This is the only tool of its kind in the industry.  (Wellsteps has one, but let’s just say the good news is that NASA employees don’t have to worry about job security, because these people aren’t rocket scientists.  If you zero out inflation, no matter what other variables you enter, the Wellsteps model always shows savings of $1359.)

You can also use this to compare two wellness programs, to determine whether your vendor is lying (they are — and we are happy to help you get your money back from them), and to pressure-test Quizzify.

Quizzify Q in B and W

Quizzify, where facts are your friend, and they’re fun, too

You can download it here.

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