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Home » AARP v. EEOC » Warning: Workplace Wellness Can Be Hazardous to Your Health

Warning: Workplace Wellness Can Be Hazardous to Your Health

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Sometimes we bring up the many ways in which conventional outcomes-based “pry, poke and prod” wellness programs harm employees. For the first time, we are putting all those harms in one place, a hand clip-and-save guide for journalists, regulators, and legislators.

This series now includes three. First is The Outcomes, Economics and Ethics of the Workplace Wellness Industry. The good news about this one is its exhaustive comprehensiveness in covering the industry’s misdeeds, garnished with 400 linkable footnotes. The bad news is it was published more than 9 months ago, too soon to capture the most recent swarm of misdeeds. For example, it predated Interactive Health’s scorched-earth screening program, designed to leave no employee undiagnosed. (This is literal — according to their own data roughly a quarter of employees discover “new conditions” every year. So in 4 years, every employee, on average, gets one new condition.)

The next was an expose of the economics of wellness, a compelling, fully sourced and linked proof that the whole pry, poke and prod endeavor served no economic purpose beyond enriching pry, poke, and prod vendors. (Screening according to guidelines, should a vendor ever choose to do it even though it would require sacrificing two-thirds of revenues in the name of integrity, would be exempted from this conclusion.)  That’s because there is no chance that vendors “playing doctor” at work saves money.


Confucius observed that an mistake that remains uncorrected after being pointed out becomes a lie. Using that definition, two-thirds of the wellness industry –– including the Koop Award Committee and the Health Enhancement Research Organization — is lying, as they are fully aware that their very stable economic genius fantasies are nothing more than the stuff dreams are made of. That also explains why the $3 million reward for showing wellness is not an epic fail remains unclaimed.


The Hazards of Workplace Wellness

This whole thing would be hilarious were it not for all the harms and hazards of workplace wellness visited on employees who are forced to choose between, as Judge Bates noted in his epic decision in AARP v. EEOC, paying two months’ rent or forfeiting that sum by submitting to needles wielded by unlicensed, unregulated and unsupervised wellness vendors. Employees should never be forced into clearly unhealthy situations at work, at least without the hazards being disclosed, and yet, today’s American Journal of Managed Care posting covers six hazards employees face as they navigate the shoals of workplace wellness:

  1. Actual, well-documented, harms to an exposed population
  2. First-person case studies and reports
  3. Crash-dieting-for-money risks
  4. Flouting of established clinical guidelines
  5. “Hyperdiagnosis” leading to unneeded medical care
  6. Incorrect or potentially harmful advice that employees are told to take

 



All of this is covered in one place this month — and is totally worth the read.

Not if you don’t have a license, aren’t required to understand what you are doing, and can force employees to harm themselves or lose money

 

 

 

 

 

 


2 Comments

  1. Sam Lippe says:

    As long as you are quoting Bogie, I’m shocked, shocked to find that dishonesty, incompetence and malpractice are going on in here!

    Like

    • whynobodybelievesthenumbers says:

      Agreed except on two points. First, it’s not malpractice, since there are no laws about what constitutes malpractice in wellness. Vendors can do anything HR will let them get away with. Second, it’s not Bogie. It was Claude Rains talking to Bogie.

      Like

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