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HealthFairs USA: A wellness program that defies description

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The English language contains 450,000 words, the most of any language, but apparently it needs a 450,001st.  Why? Because whoever invented the first 450,000 words had obviously not reviewed HealthFairs USA’s wellness program, which no existing word comes close to describing.

First, they test for cancer — with 99% accuracy!  This precision may seem impossible but their claim is correct in that 99% of the words in the clipping below are indeed spelled accurately. (This is actually a better track record than the rest of their website, in which they describe their “unparallelled” customer service and how they “minimize your companies risk” and “build company moral.”  They also advertise “less call-outs for sickness,” by which I suspect they mean “fewer absences.”)

preventest-check-swab

Besides the slight problem that this statement is beyond absurd about a zillion different ways, Preventest lacks FDA approval (and — equally surprisingly given their accuracy — a Nobel Prize). That doesn’t stop HealthFairs USA from submitting claims to insurance companies and promising “no out of pocket cost” in most cases:

preventest-insurance-reimbursement

By the way, there is no FDA-approved genetic “check swab,” or test of any kind, let alone one with 99% accuracy, for any cancer. And few cancers on this list even have a genetic component. (Bladder cancer, for example, is 100% environmental.)


But wait…there’s more. Now how much would your insurance company pay?  HealthFairs USA is selling worthless nutritional supplements and submitting insurance claims for those as well:

preventest-supplements

Let’s review what they’ve told us so far: they perform useless, non-FDA-approved tests and sell useless, non-FDA-approved supplements to employees who don’t need them, and then submit bills to third party payors.  Can anyone spell insurance fraud? I doubt they can, since they can’t even spell “alleviates.” (So much for their 99% accuracy target.)


How does this benefit employees?

preventest-how-does-this-benefit-me

Lots of ways. Employees can submit to more frequent screenings.  And I’ve always said the problem with the US healthcare system is that employees don’t get screened enough. (not!)

Or, they can take medications. It’s not clear which ones, and there aren’t any “medications” that are FDA-approved for preventing most cancers in any case. But whichever ones you take, I’m sure they’ll figure out how to bill the insurance company for them. Most importantly, you can “have risk reducing surgical procedures.” Hmm. What word can describe a wellness vendor recommending surgery for employees tagged by non-FDA-approved cancer screens for a possibly elevated risk of cancer?

Make that 450,002.

Indeed, a true wellness program might consist of warning employees not to get anywhere near HealthFairs USA, so clearly these people don’t have any accounts of any sophistication, right?  Right?

Wrong.

They claim a household name company as one of their accounts. That means they are submitting insurance claims to their insurers on behalf of their employees, as directed and incentivized by their human resources department. I’m not a practicing attorney, but I am a practicing non-idiot, and as such my opinion would be that they look into this posthaste.

Yes, I know it’s not like me not to name names…but any whistleblower fee is not applicable if the information is already public. And, incredibly given the rather modest readership of this blog, being in TSW counts as public information.

And plus, it’s not like they’re completely fraudulent. They have references from stellar companies with outstnading reputations:

healthfairs-wells-fargo

Full disclosure: I’m not 100% sure that it is actually illegal to submit insurance claims for useless, unapproved, possibly harmful, USPSTF D-rated screens and useless, unapproved, probably harmful, supplements for employees who have no diagnosis, no recognized medical necessity and aren’t seen by a real doctor.

Quite the contrary, my opinion may only be 99% accurate.

 

 


4 Comments

  1. Dell Dorn says:

    Keep up the good work, you do make a difference.

    Like

    • whynobodybelievesthenumbers says:

      Thanks. And the support of Viewers Like You and the other 5200 TSW followers means a lot not just to me but to the perps. They can no longer pretend facts don’t exist.

      Like

  2. Samiam says:

    This is hilarious, but you need to not gloss over the harms that these tests and these supplements can cause. You are absolutely not supposed to load your body with “powerful antioxidants,” for example. Here is a link: https://www.organicconsumers.org/scientific/synthetic-antioxidants-can-harm-your-health

    These tests would lead to hazardous biopsies that only rarely would reveal cancer.

    Like

    • whynobodybelievesthenumbers says:

      Your link is to an organic trade association but there are certainly many more mainstream studies — try googling — that would support that viewpoint. And, yes, obviously this cancer nonsense is way more harmful, as you say. I’d summon the authorities but there are no authorities in this field to summon.

      Like

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